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Tag: Iomega Zip Drive

The 100 MB Zip drive was introduced by Iomega in late 1994, with later versions supporting 250 MB and then 750 MB.

Backwards compatibility:
The 250 MB drive also read and write 100 MB disk.
The 750 MB drive also read and write 250 MB disks, but can only can read 100 MB disks, not write to them.

Interface support:
100 MB Drives: USB 1.1, IDE, SCSI, or Parallel Port interfaces (the Plus supports both SCSI and Parallel)
250 MB Drives: USB 1.1, IDE, SCSI, Parallel Port (IEEE 1284) or Firewire (IEEE 1394).
750 MB Drives: USB 2.0, IDE or Firewire (IEEE 1394).

BalenaEtcher: Using balenaEtcher to create and write disk images

You can use balaenaEtcher to raw-write my drive image files to an SD or Compact Flash Card, and some other USB attached storage. When you raw-write a file it doesn’t simply copy the file to the target storage media/device it writes the file bit-by-bit on to the target storage media/device removing all existing formatting.

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Iomega Zip: Using a 100MB SCSI Iomega Zip Drive to setup your 68k Macintosh

Iomega ZipDrive
Iomega Zip drive

I’ve recently been experimenting to see if I could somehow use of my old Iomega Zip drives (a 250MB USB version, and a 100MB SCSI) to move files between my Windows PC and my various 68k Macintosh Systems.   After a bit of experimentation I discovered how I could not only move files, but also create a disk image that would allow me to use my Windows PC to make fully bootable Zip disks for use with any of the SCSI capable 68k Macintosh systems.

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Setting up your vintage (classic) 68k Macintosh

I recently pulled my old Macintosh Color Classic (with an Apple IIe Emulator Card) out of storage in preparation for a move to see if it still works (last used in 2001)… so far so good.   I also obtained a Macintosh LCIII to setup as my backup system in case the Macintosh Color Classic decides to die on me (need to get a cap job done on both of them).

When I started to look for the guides etc.  that I used back in 1999/2000, I quickly found out that Apple has finally started to abandon these old machines, removing the free downloads and knowledge base articles that vintage mac users have relied on.  Luckily the software can still be found on the internet archive, or sites like the Macintosh Garden and the Macintosh Repository, but it looks like it will be a lot harder to find the information that used to be in the knowledge base.   To help myself remember what to do in the future, and to hopefully help others, I’ve decided to put up a series of posts on how to set up these old systems with links to the disk images and files I use.

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